4 Star Books · ARC Book Reviews · Book Reviews · feminism · LGBTQIA+ Books · memoir

The Bold World: A Memoir of Family and Transformation by Jodie Patterson | ARC #BookReview

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The Bold World: A Memoir of Family and Transformation by Jodie Patterson

Published: January 29, 2019

Publisher: Ballantine Books

Pages: 352

Genres: memoir, LGBTQIA+, feminism,

Rating: 4 stars 

Recommend to fans of: learning about a family’s journey through learning from and educating for their trans kid, the LGBTQIA+ community, brave powerful women 

Foodie Vibes: Southern cooking

 

Synopsis: 

As an African American growing up on Manhattan’s Upper West Side in the 1970s, when neighborhoods defined people, Jodie Patterson learned early on to engage with her community for strength and comfort. But then in 2009 this mother of five had her world turned upside down. Realizing that her definition of community wasn’t wide enough for her own child’s needs, Patterson forced the world wide open.

In The Bold World, we witness a mother reshaping her attitudes and beliefs, as well as those of her community, to meet the needs of her transgender son, Penelope– and opening the minds of everyone in her family who absolutely, unequivocally refused to conform.

As we walk alongside Patterson on her journey, we meet the Southern women who came before her–the mother, grandmothers, and aunts who raised and fortified her, all the while challenging cultural norms and gender expectations. She shares her family’s history–particularly incidents within the Black community around sexism, racism, and civil rights. We learn about her children, who act as a vehicle for Jodie Patterson’s own growth and acceptance of her diverse family, and her experiences as a wife, mother, and, eventually, activist. The result is an intimate portrait and an exquisite study in identity, courage, and love. Patterson’s relentless drive to change the world will resonate with and inspire us all, reflecting our own individual strength and tenacity, our very real fears, and, most of all, our singular ability to transform despite the odds.

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, Ballantine Books, and Jodie Patterson for an ARC ebook copy to review. As always, an honest review from me. 

Like: 

  • Hearing all of the author’s life lessons learned through there personal experiences, from friends and family, and through parenting
  • The power of the Black Panther Movement for her
  • Discussions of power 
  • Representation: trans boy in a black family
  • The overall journey of her son and learning to be a part of the trans community

Love:

  • The life lesson: to define yourself or the world will; distance yourself from anyone who said you need to be anyone other than yourself
  • Her overall continual journey of personal growth 
  • The message that trans people don’t need to change their names, bodies, clothes, hormones, etc. to be considered a certain gender, or even need to identify with a gender, but they may choose to do so if it feels right to them

Dislike:

  • Once someone refers to Penelope as not a real boy, if I remember correctly. I’m not sure who said it or what their intentions were, but still … 
  • Her father’s harsh way of parenting

Wish that:

  • There was a little less about her childhood. While there were lots of great life lessons, it became a little long winded at times.

 

Overall, a good comprehensive memoir about the author’s life, journey through personal growth, advocacy and learning bout her son’s life as a trans boy. 

 

Bookish Question: 

Have you read this book?

What did you think?

 

Add to your Goodreads TBR

 

Come say hi!

Twitter: @BooksAndLife1

Instagram: @BooksLifeAndEverythingNice

Goodreads: Amanda (Books, Life and Everything Nice)

Facebook: @BooksLifeAndEverythingNice

3 Star Books · Book Reviews · Medical · memoir · mental health · non fiction · psychology · religion · Self Help

Mindfulness Matters: A Guide to Mastering Your Life by Pax Tandon

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Mindfulness Matters: A Guide to Mastering Your Life by Pax Tandon

Published: June 28, 2018

Publisher: Red Feather

Pages: 224

Genres: non fiction, psychology, memoir, self help, alternative medicine, spirituality

Rating: 3 stars 

Recommend to fans of: alternative medicine, preventative care for your body, taking charge of your life from all aspects

Foodie Vibes: well balanced healthy diet to fuel your mind, body and soul

 

Synopsis:

Get the insider’s scoop on how to attain a fully flourishing life. Encompassing deep dives into mind, body, and spirit, you will be introduced to the science of positive psychology, engage with the practice of mindfulness, learn how to build an optimally efficient body, and commit to an elevation of your spirit. This is flourishing in action! Whether struggling with anxiety or depression, searching to fill a missing void, or just interested in everyday self-care, you will learn to identify opportunities for growth and seamlessly integrate life-changing practices into daily habits. Replete with powerful affirmations and practice exercises throughout, you will be able to build the framework that fuels and furthers your evolutionary journey for years to come and changes the trajectory of your life forever.

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, Red Feather and Pax Tandon for an ebook copy to review. As always, an honest review from me. 

Mindfulness Matters is a fun, kind, lighthearted book that covers a lot of topics. If you want to know the author’s thoughts on basically all aspects of life ranging from physical and mental health to dating and even alternative medicine, you will find it all here. 

There are many topics in which I agree with her. The focus on sleep hygiene is great. I’m even going to take her suggestion and look into an app to filter out blue light. Also her focus on compassion which will help prevent anger is much appreciated. Most of the book highlights the importance of self care in some manner. 

A lot of the book is the author telling her story. While it’s interesting and informative, I found it difficult to apply to my life. There were also parts that I absolutely disagree with. While she meant well, talking about post traumatic growth as an option instead of PTSD felt a little invalidating. Also I wish the mentions of hot yoga came with a health waring. Hot yoga can be wonderful, but also not safe for people with certain health conditions. Great for her, but not for all. While incredibly interesting, I’m not sure that all of the information was scientifically accurate, so a reminder to all to do their own research before making health, wellness, and lifestyle changes. 

Obviously I have some strong concerns on the book. Enjoyable, informative, and highlights the benefits of alternative medicine and lifestyle choices. Just be cautious when making changes for yourself based on someone else’s lifestyle. Do what’s right for you.

What’s your favorite self care activity?

Bookish Posts · Medical · What You Missed Wednesdays

What You Missed Wednesdays – Medical Edition

adult beautiful blue eyes book
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

What You Missed Wednesdays is exactly as it sounds!

Book reviews of each week’s genre of choice that you might have missed, and I think you should really hear about.

3 Books a Week with 3 Words/Phrases to Describe Them 

Click on the title of each book to be taken to my full review.

I hope you find new books that you’re excited to add to your TBR!

________________________

 

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Passionate Rivals by Radclyffe

4.5/5 stars

Realistic medical romance, strong women, LGBTQIA+ representation 

Add to Goodreads TBR

 

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Flat: Reclaiming My Body from Breast Cancer by Catherine Guthrie

5/5 stars

Very important memoir, forge your own path, supportive without smothering

Add to Goodreads TBR

 

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The Atlas of Disease: Mapping Deadly Epidemics and Contagion from the Plague to the Zika Virus by Sandra Hempel

4/5 stars

Unique way of learning, visual learners, science nerds

Add to Goodreads TBR

 

___________________________

 

Well there you have it!

Another edition of What You Missed Wednesdays.

Keep coming back each Wednesday for more Can’t Miss Books!

Which book(s) are you now adding to your TBR?

___________________________

 

Twitter: Follow @BooksAndLife1

Instagram: Follow @BooksLifeAndEverythingNice

Goodreads: Follow Amanda (Books, Life and Everything Nice)

Facebook: Follow @BooksLifeAndEverythingNice

3.5 Star Books · Book Reviews · Medical · memoir · non fiction

Dispatches from the Heart: Transplanting One Heart and Transforming Many Others by Ed and Paige Innerarity

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Dispatches from the Heart: Transplanting One Heart and Transforming Many Others by Ed and Paige Innerarity

Published: June 6, 2018

Publisher: River Grove Books

Pages: 202

Genres: non fiction, memoir, medical

Rating: 3.5 stars

Recommend to fans of: using faith to get through a difficult time, heartfelt stories, inspiring reads

Foodie Vibes: healthy foods that protect your heart

 

Synopsis:

Ed Innerarity was a regular guy: He liked to fly fish, ride his bike, and laugh with his family, and he attended church every Sunday. He also had a heart condition called cardiomyopathy and needed a new heart. Ed refused to even consider a heart transplant until his doctor gave him two options: Get a heart transplant or check in to a hospice care facility. He didn’t want to die.

Dispatches from the Heart is a compilation of emails from friends, family, and the authors themselves describing Ed’s journey through the heart transplant process. Full of compelling, inspiring, and often witty insights into this life-changing event, Ed and Paige share the challenges and triumphs they both faced before, during, and after Ed’s life-saving surgery.

This book is a tribute to those who helped make a second chance at life possible, an invitation into the intimate inner dialogue of a family ever changed, and a beacon of hope for those who may be part of a similar journey.

 

Review:

I won this book for free through Goodreads Giveaways. Thank you to Goodreads, the author and publisher for the ebook copy. As always, an honest review from me.

Dispatches from the Heart is the life journey of Ed, who needs and ends up receiving a heart transplant in his 60s. The touching insightful memoir highlights the importance of healthy life choices. Even if they can’t prevent illness, they can help the person live their best life during the struggles and potentially slow the progression of the health issue. Ed has cardiomyopathy, a genetic condition in which the heart gets weaker and less efficient over time. Due to his family history he got tested and knew he would eventually succumb to the same disease his mother passed away from. 

The book is a unique look into the journey a lot of families go through. Knowing you need an organ transplant, but not knowing if you will get one. His story is told through different forms: passages from him and his wife looking back, emails from him or his wife, email responses from loved ones, photos, song suggestions, and occasionally short descriptions of the medical terminology. It gives an authentic look what the family was going through during this difficult time. The family looks towards their faith a lot during this challenging time, as they do throughout the rest of life as well. 

I liked that he highlights the important of pre-hab while on the waiting list for a cardiac transplant. It shows the importance of strengthening your body before the transplant, so you can have the best chance for a good outcome. 

While the outlook is extremely positive, it may be difficult for people who are struggling with the transplant process, because they may not see themselves in his process. While he struggled, as well as his family, it wasn’t shown that much. That’s fine. Completely his choice what he shares, but it could alienate some people who are struggling to deal with and relate. 

Overall, an enlightening, inspiring book that shows Ed’s journey in the organ transplant process. A great read for someone who may know someone going through something similar and wants to know more about it. 

5 Star Books · Book Reviews · memoir

This Is Me by Chrissy Metz

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This Is Me: Loving the Person You Are Today by Chrissy Metz

Published: March 27, 2018

Publisher: Day Street Books

Pages: 308

Genres: memoir

Rating: 5 stars

Recommend to fans of: This Is Us, books that speak to you in the most profound way, Oprah mentions!, self evolutions 

Foodie Vibes: food that feeds your body and nourishes your soul

 

Synopsis:

A prescriptive and inspirational book of life lessons from the Emmy Award-nominee and breakout star of television’s #1 hit show, NBC’s This Is Us.

Debuting in fall 2016, This Is Us quickly became America’s most watched—and most talked about—network television show. Within weeks of its premier, actress Chrissy Metz and her character, Kate, were embraced by countless fans. Seemingly overnight, Chrissy found herself on magazine covers and talk shows, walking red carpets, and the subject of endless conversations on social media.

Chrissy chalks up her popularity to the authenticity of the role. She believes that fans sense she is playing a character whose life is not so very different from her own. It is a performance that comes from her heart and gut, from a universal place that rings true. In reality, Chrissy’s presence, her perseverance in Hollywood, and her success story is as genuine—and as inspirational—as it gets. There is no better person to represent and speak out for the everywoman and her experiences.

Embracing the spirit of Shonda Rhime’s Year of Yes, Chrissy’s touching, wise, and honest book speaks to all of us. Blending love and experience, Chrissy encourages us to claim our rightful place in a world that may be trying to knock us down from all sides. Throughout, her positivity, confidence, and humor are infectious, whether she’s talking about her past or present, and she offers amazing one-liners such as:

Who needs to fit in when you’re meant to stand out?
You need to both know better and do better!
The key is to act deserving, but not entitled.

Not your standard celebrity memoir or essay collection, Why Fit in When You’re Meant to Stand Out is a smart and helpful guide for living through tough stuff and coming out the other side, written by a woman who has done just that. Grounded and spiritual, Chrissy teaches each one of us how to find our own unique voice—and pursue our dreams.

 

Review:

I absolutely flew through this gem of a book. I put aside the other books I was reading, because I could not stop reading this one. I’m a huge fan of This Is Us, so of course I had to read Chrissy’s memoir. We learn so much about her life story. But what’s even better is all the life lessons that she shares with us. It’s like having an awesome, smart, and incredibly kind big sister give us a helping hand in life. I could have highlighted almost every page, because there was so much relatable wisdom shared. I loved the mix of her life journey combined with incredibly relatable anecdotes about her struggles, triumphs, and lessons learned along the way. I cannot get enough of her book, so now I’m going on YouTube and searching for her interviews. She’s brilliant! A quick amazing read that I highly recommend!

 

How many of you watch This Is Us? 

Which Pearson(s) do you relate to most? 

3 Star Books · ARC Book Reviews · Book Reviews · feminism · memoir

ARC Book Review | Freedom is an Inside Job by Zainab Salbi

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Freedom is an Inside Job: Owning Our Darkness and Our Light to Heal Ourselves and the World by Zainab Salbi

Published: October 2, 2018

Publisher: Sounds True

Pages: 184

Genres: memoir

Rating: 3 stars 

Recommend to fans of: enlightening personal exploration, learning to forgive people who have hurt you, stories of women who grew up in Iraq

Foodie Vibes: homemade authentic Iraqi meals shared with family

 

Synopsis:

By all appearances, Zainab Salbi has had an impressive life. Growing up as the daughter of Saddam Hussein’s personal pilot, she eventually became a celebrated humanitarian and activist. Yet, as she was helping thousands of women in war-torn countries, Salbi’s personal life was coming to a crisis. In Freedom Is an Inside Job, Salbi explores her own riveting journey to wholeness—and how embarking on such a journey enables each of us to create the world we want to live in.

After years of working as a successful CEO and change-maker, Salbi realized that if she wanted to confront and heal the shadows of the world, she needed to face her own shadows first—and this could only be done by looking within. Through personal anecdotes, real-life stories, parables, and insightful guidance, Salbi takes us through a process of self-discovery. We learn to uncover our hidden motives and desires so we can live in alignment with our authentic values. “As long as we are conflicted within, we will continue to live in conflict without,” writes Salbi. “If we want to change the world, we must begin with ourselves.”

 

Review:

I won this book for free through a Goodreads Giveaway. Thank you to Goodreads, Sounds True Publishing, and Zainab Salbi for a free ebook copy. As always, an honest review from me.

Zainab Salbi’s story takes us from her childhood in Iraq to an arranged marriage in America to founding an organization to help women all over the world. She’s very accomplished. The book is her life story along with all the lessons she’s learned along the way. 

Her story is unique, yet many women can relate to her emotions and lessons learned. I liked that we get a peek into daily life of women living in Iraq at that time, not just what the U.S. mainstream media was delivering – a very limited, one sided view of the world. The life lessons of forgiveness, shame and fear, taking inventory of one’s inner self, and rediscovering your feelings is a main focus. There’s a lot to learn from her experiences and revelations.

However as great as her story is, it isn’t captivate me personally. It’s not boring by any means, but jumps around a bit. Also some parts feel like a therapy session for her; a book of remorse and past mistakes. It’s important to acknowledge but it dominated a lot of the chapters.

Overall, the story of the author’s life combined with the lessons she learned pull together to educate, inspire and enlighten others. The cons of the book made it not quite as enjoyable as I had hoped.

 

 

3 Star Books · ARC Book Reviews · Book Reviews · memoir · non fiction · Self Help

New Release | A Year of Living Kindly by Donna Cameron

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A Year of Living Kindly by Donna Cameron

Published: September 25, 2018

Publisher: She Writes Press

Pages: 256

Genres: self help, non fiction, memoir

Rating: 3 stars

Recommend to fans of: ways to be kinder to others, other people’s inspirational journeys, improving society as a whole

Foodie Vibes: homemade chocolate chip cookies and conversation to share with a neighbor

 

Synopsis:

Being kind is something most of us do when it’s easy and when it suits us. Being kind when we don’t feel like it, or when all of our buttons are being pushed, is hard. But that’s also when it’s most needed; that’s when it can defuse anger and even violence, when it can restore civility in our personal and virtual interactions. Kindness has the power to profoundly change our relationships with other people and with ourselves. It can, in fact, change the world.

In A Year of Living Kindly—using stories, observation, humor, and summaries of expert research—Donna Cameron shares her experience committing to 365 days of practicing kindness. She presents compelling research into the myriad benefits of kindness, including health, wealth, longevity, improved relationships, and personal and business success. She explores what a kind life entails, and what gets in the way of it. And she provides practical and experiential suggestions for how each of us can strengthen our kindness muscle so choosing a life of kindness becomes ever easier and more natural. An inspiring, practical guide that can help any reader make a commitment to kindness, A Year of Living Kindly shines a light on how we can create a better, safer, and more just world—and how you can be part of that transformation.

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, She Writes Press and Donna Cameron for an ARC ebook copy to review. As always, an honest review from me.

Donna Cameron set off on a year long commitment to live more kindly. After realizing she was consistently nice but not always kind, she wanted to change that behavior within herself. First she started a blog about her journey and then she wrote this book.

To clarify, nice is benign, easy, passive, safe. Kind is going above and beyond to truly connect with another person on a human level, even if only for a few minutes.

I enjoyed the book and overall concept. We definitely need more kindness in the world. There were many examples of ways to be kind in all areas of life. If one doesn’t know where to start, it’s easy to take the author’s examples and mimic them until you find your own way. She inspired me to jot down little quotes or encouragement on post its to leave for family and friends, to make sure they know they are seen and appreciated. I definitely wouldn’t have done this if not for reading the book. I also liked the benefits listed for living more kindly. I wrote down a lot of relevant information for myself. 

However, I wish there was a bigger focus on kindness to oneself. She states it’s the most important type of kindness, but doesn’t focus on it much. Also there are many chapters about kindness and raising children. For someone who doesn’t have kids, this isn’t particularly relevant. 

A Year of Living Kindly is good but has a lot of information to take in. Perhaps a book to reread and possibly even discuss in a book club if you participate in one. 

 

How can you act kindly today?

Share your ideas in the comments, to help give others some great ideas!

5 Star Books · ARC Book Reviews · Book Reviews · Chronic Illness/Disabilities · feminism · LGBTQIA+ Books · Medical · memoir · mental health · non fiction

New Release | Flat: Reclaiming My Body from Breast Cancer by Catherine Guthrie

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Flat: Reclaiming My Body from Breast Cancer by Catherine Guthrie

Published: September 25, 2018

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing

Pages: 264

Genres: memoir, LGBTQIA+, medical, non fiction, feminism

Rating: 5 stars

Recommend to fans of: memoirs that don’t gloss over the difficulties, women who tell it like it is

Foodie Vibes: green tea, rice cereal with almond milk

 

Synopsis:

A feminist breast cancer memoir of medical trauma, love, and how she found the strength to listen to her body. As a young, queer woman, Catherine Guthrie had worked hard to feel at home in her body. However, after years writing about women’s health and breast cancer, Guthrie is thrust into the role of the patient after a devastating diagnosis at age thirty-eight. At least, she thinks, I know what I’m up against.

She was wrong. In one horrifying moment after another, everything that could go wrong does–the surgeon gives her a double mastectomy but misses the cancerous lump, one of the most effective drug treatments fails, and a doctor’s error may have unleashed millions of breast cancer cells into her body.

Flat is Guthrie’s story of how two bouts of breast cancer shook her faith in her body, her relationship, and medicine. Along the way, she challenges the view that breasts are essential to femininity and paramount to a woman’s happiness. Ultimately, she traces an intimate portrayal of how cancer reshapes her relationship with Mary, her partner, revealing–in the midst of crisis–a love story.

Filled with candor, vulnerability, and resilience, Guthrie upends the “pink ribbon” narrative and offers a unique perspective on womanhood, what it means to be “whole,” and the importance of women advocating for their desires. Flat is a story about how she found the strength to forge an unconventional path–one of listening to her body–that she’d been on all along.

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, Skyhorse Publishing and Catherine Guthrie for an ARC ebook copy for review. As always, an honest review from me.

My honest to goodness first thoughts were something along the lines of, well this will be a depressing read. And in some ways it is. Cancer sucks. But the book is also educating, validating, inspiring, harrowing, and thought provoking. The intersection of medicine, feminism, and the LGBTQIA+ community is unlike anything I’ve ever read before. Her story fills a gap of information and experiences that’s not discussed in the world of pink on pink on pink of breast cancer.

Flat gives a voice to women who choose not to have reconstructive breast surgery after a mastectomy. At first thought it seems like such a radical idea, but after reading I’ve become so much more educated the autonomy that women should have over their own bodies, especially when dealing with a health crisis. The story is not a happily ever after fluffy feel good Lifetime movie nor is it so utterly depressing, but a real life look at living with cancer and fighting for your life and happiness. 

As I’m writing this I cannot think of anything negative to say about the book, so I’m bumping up the star rating to a 5. 

While it’s a bit of a heavy topic, do yourself a favor and read the book. The discussions about health, feminism, the medical world, relationships, chronic illness and body autonomy are fascinating, necessary and impactful. 

 

How can books teach us things we didn’t know we needed to learn? #privilege 

5 Star Books · Book Reviews · memoir · mental health · Uncategorized

Surviving Myself: How an Eating Disorder, A Car Crash and a Stroke Taught Me to Love My Life and Finally Live It by Dina Pestonji

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Surviving Myself: How an Eating Disorder, A Car Crash and a Stroke Taught Me to Love My Life and Finally Live It by Dina Pestonji

Published: July 19, 2018

Publisher: Tellwell Talent

Pages: 350

Genres: memoir, mental health, autobiography

Rating: 5 stars

Recommend to fans of: memoirs about strong women, life lessons, authentic eating disorder representation

Foodie Vibes: homemade Indian food surrounded by family

 

Synopsis:

GROWING UP, DINA PESTONJI was afforded all the comfort, love and affection anyone could ask for. She should have been a happy, carefree girl. But from the age of 10, she felt uncomfortably “different,” like an ugly brown duckling in a sea of perfect girls with white skin and blue eyes.

In this powerful, brutally honest memoir, Dina vividly describes the losing battle that engulfed her mind and body—one with a hateful, self-loathing and cruel inner critic.

Consumed by a misguided obsession with fitting in, being exceptional and “perfect,” she unknowingly allowed a deep self-hatred to set in over the years—a hatred that not even her acceptance at the swankiest schools nor a dream job in California could change. Only after surviving a horrific car crash and a paralyzing stroke while still in her 20s, did she begin to see herself for who she really was: strong, independent, a fighter…blessed.

Surviving Myself, is the captivating, emotionally charged story of the author’s journey to self-acceptance and inner peace, narrated with the refreshing candour of a close friend. Alternately humourous, shocking and heartbreaking, it is also the story of a family’s overflowing love.

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, Tellwell Talent and Dina Pestonji for an ebook copy for review. As always, an honest review from me. 

The title pretty much sums up the book. Dina struggles with an eating disorder in her teen years, constantly feels different from her peers, gets into a car crash, moves abroad several times, and has a stroke. All before the age of 30. That’s a lot of information for a person to get in 30 seconds, not to mention experience in 30 years. 

Her story is remarkable, inspiring and so relatable. Even if you haven’t dealt with all of the challenges that she has, you will still be able to relate to a lot of her feelings. Feelings of isolation, loneliness, loving your family but wanting to prove your independence, frustration, finding your place in the world, hopelessness and courage. The writing is so relatable. It’s like listening to a really smart mentor give you all the life lessons you need to know. I would read another 350 pages of her experiences and insight. 

The only aspect that slightly annoyed me was reading the younger years. Maybe age 10 and 11. Since it’s in 1st person, the writing is from a pre teen’s perspective. Makes sense for the story, but not my favorite age range to read about. These are only minor details though.

Overall a fantastic memoir that really resonated with me. Do yourself a favor and give Surviving Myself by Dina Pestonji a read!

 

Which of Dina’s experiences can you relate to?

3.5 Star Books · ARC Book Reviews · Book Reviews · Essays · memoir · mental health · non fiction

ARC Book Review | Nobody Cares by Anne T. Donahue

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Nobody Cares by Anne T. Donahue

Published: September 18, 2018 

Publisher: ECW Press

Pages: 240 

Genres: non fiction, memoir, essays

Rating: 3.5 stars

Recommend to fans of: relatable tell it like it is memoirs, people in their 20s and 30s who don’t have it all together but feel like they should 

Foodie Vibes: wine, noodles with butter because it’s cheap and helps numb out life

 

Synopsis:

From the author of the popular newsletter That’s What She SaidNobody Cares is a frank, funny personal essay collection about work, failure, feminism, and the messy business of being alive in your twenties and thirties.

As she shares her hard-won insights from screwing up, growing up, and trying to find her own path, Anne T. Donahue’s debut book offers all the honesty, laughs, and reassurance of a late-night phone call with your best friend. Whether she’s giving a signature pep talk, railing against summer, or describing her own mental health struggles, Anne reminds us that failure is normal, saying to no to things is liberating, and that we’re all a bunch of beautiful disasters — and she wouldn’t have it any other way.

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, ECW Press and Anne T. Donahue for an ARC ebook copy for review. As always, an honest review from me.

My rating is actually 3.5 stars, but since there aren’t half stars I always round up.

Nobody Cares is funny, poignant, relatable and ridiculous in all the best ways. Through the author’s essays we experience her highs and lows, struggles and life lessons learned. She’s like the older sister/friend with the cautionary life tales to help you feel less alone and avoid her mistakes. Number 1 being figure out your stuff, be vulnerable and don’t be afraid to seek therapy. It will save you a lot of difficulty and heartache along the years.

I really liked her honesty. She says the things that people often sugar coat, without going out of her way to be edgy and dramatic. Her story is so dang (damn? I still feel bad about swearing in reviews, like I’m going to get in trouble for doing so) relatable. The life lessons that she passes on to the reader are validating.

However, some of the stories bounce around a bit so there’s an adjustment when reading. Also, it became redundant reading about her making the same mistakes multiple times. While it’s authentic to her and life in general, I felt frustrated after awhile.

Overall, an incredibly relatable and funny memoir of essays. I think the tone of the book is best summer up by this quote.

“In our small section of the galaxy, many of us are dealing with things that aren’t ours enough to talk about, but are still ours enough that we have to deal with them.” Bam! That’s so it.

 

What advice would you give your 20 something year old self?