ARC Book Reviews · Book Reviews · Business · feminism · mental health · non fiction · Self Help

Brave, Not Perfect: Fear Less, Fail More, and Live Bolder by Reshma Saujani | ARC #BookReview

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Brave, Not Perfect: Fear Less, Fail More, and Live Bolder by Reshma Saujani

Published: February 5, 2019

Publisher: Currency

Pages: 208

Genres: non fiction, self help, business, feminism 

Rating: 5 stars 

Recommend to fans of: books that inspire you, point out gender stereotypes, strong brave women

Foodie Vibes: chocolate cake – Have your cake and eat it too

 

Synopsis: 

In a book inspired by her popular TED talk, New York Times bestselling author Reshma Saujani empowers women and girls to embrace imperfection and bravery.

Imagine if you lived without the fear of not being good enough. If you didn’t care how your life looked on Instagram, or worry about what total strangers thought of you. Imagine if you could let go of the guilt, and stop beating yourself up for tiny mistakes. What if, in every decision you faced, you took the bolder path?

Too many of us feel crushed under the weight of our own expectations. We run ourselves ragged trying to please everyone, all the time. We lose sleep ruminating about whether we may have offended someone, pass up opportunities that take us out of our comfort zones, and avoid rejection at all costs.

There’s a reason we act this way, Reshma says. As girls, we were taught to play it safe. Well-meaning parents and teachers praised us for being quiet and polite, urged us to be careful so we didn’t get hurt, and steered us to activities at which we could shine.

The problem is that perfect girls grow up to be women who are afraid to fail. It’s time to stop letting our fears drown out our dreams and narrow our world, along with our chance at happiness.

By choosing bravery over perfection, we can find the power to claim our voice, to leave behind what makes us unhappy, and go for the things we genuinely, passionately want. Perfection may set us on a path that feels safe, but bravery leads us to the one we’re authentically meant to follow.

In Brave, Not Perfect, Reshma shares powerful insights and practices to help us override our perfect girl training and make bravery a lifelong habit. By being brave, not perfect, we can all become the authors of our biggest, boldest, and most joyful life.

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, Currency, and Reshma Saujani for an ARC ebook copy to review. As always, an honest review from me. 

Like: 

  • A self help business book for woman without being overly technical or dry
  • She launched Girls Who Code and ran for political office
  • Gives a voice to all the things that so many women experience 

Love:

  • Incredibly relatable 
  • That bravery is a muscle: the more you use it, the stronger your bravery muscle will be
  • The author’s voice/writing style: professional, authoritative, but relatable and kind
  • The message that its okay to not be liked, because those just aren’t your people
  • The quote “In a world full of princesses, dare to be a hot dog.” 

Dislike:

Wish that: 

  • There were a few more practical examples of how to be brave on a day to day basis
  • The book was longer!

Overall,  a very powerful, relatable book that every woman needs to read. Even if you think you’re brave, I think you will find many elements of value in here. A book I’m going to be referencing again and again. 

 

For all the ladies out there,

How can you be brave today?

 

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2.5 Star Books · Book Reviews · Philosophy · Self Help

Purpose-Volume 1: Meditation on Love, Relationship, Fear, Death, Intuition, and Power – Uncovering Our Resistance to Life by Noura

 

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Purpose-Volume 1: Meditation on Love, Relationship, Fear, Death, Intuition, and Power – Uncovering Our Resistance to Life by Noura

Published: February 28, 2018

Publisher: ?

Pages: 276

Genres: self help, philosophy

Rating: 2.5 stars

Recommend to fans of: hard but helpful realities, examining your thoughts to make changes

Foodie Vibes: pure spring water

 

Synopsis:

Is it possible to have clarity about ourselves that enables us to understand ourselves totally so we never have to rely on any belief? If we can look and see clearly for ourselves, are beliefs necessary?

Some of the topics this book explores include but aren’t limited to the following:

” Using meditation as a tool for self-inquiry and observation
” Mastering the mind through the mastery of love, which doesn’t oppose
” Empowering ourselves through mastery of the mind
” Love as our natural state, which can be hidden or denied but never destroyed
” Darkness as the false in us to be undone through total understanding of ourselves
” Unity of purpose as the foundation of our thinking versus the belief in separation as the foundation of our thinking
” The strength of unity in relation to mental strength
” How fear and violence arise in our thinking
” Uncovering our resistance to life and freeing ourselves from that resistance
” Relationships, death, intuition, intelligence, greed, joy, forgiveness, and integrity
” Respecting the power of belief
” Boundaries versus defenses
” Duality versus nonduality
” The mastery of love versus the mastery of darkness
” Purpose

 

Review:

I won this book for free in a Goodreads Giveaway. Thanks to Goodreads, Noura and the publisher for an ebook copy for review. As always, an honest review.

Purpose-Volume 1 reads like a long continuous stream of someone’s thoughts that is later grouped into chapters. The book starts with telling the reader to keep an open mind and not make any judgments. I tried to do that, but couldn’t. Some of it was because I still have aspects of myself I need to work on. But other parts of the book I definitely disagree with, no matter how much of an open mind I keep.

Most of the book I agree with in general, but when it comes to putting the concepts into practice they don’t hold true. For example, being kind to everyone and giving up your defenses. It’s good advice to not be so guarded all the time. However I believe that giving up all your defenses is stupid. Be cautiously kind and optimistic but also keep yourself safe. Then again maybe I’m not as evolved and enlightened as the author. Also the writing style made it hard to hold my attention. In parts I had to force myself to keep reading.

I did learn things about myself and highlighted lots of relevant passages. As the author says, use the book as a mirror to the inner workings of your mind.

Overall the book makes some good points about life, but the writing style makes it harder to read and less enjoyable. In theory it works, but in practicality not as much.

 

What do you look for in a self help book?