3.5 Star Books · Book Reviews · LGBTQIA+ Books · Medical · romance

Love to the Rescue by Radclyffe | #BookReview #LGBTQIA+ #RomanceBooks

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Love to the Rescue by Radclyffe

 

Rating: 3.5 stars

Published: April 1, 2019

Publisher: Radclyffe

Pages: 240

Genres: Romance, medical, LGBTQIA+

Recommend to fans of: Radl

 

Synopsis:

 

The last time Brody Clark left the Rivers, she walked away from her life―her foolish dreams, her few friends, and the secrets she’d kept from everyone. For ten years she’d told herself there was nothing in her past she cared about―not the family who’d given her a home or the one girl she never stopped thinking about. But now she’s back as part of the new medevac flight crew, for at least as long as it takes to finally bury her ghosts.
Val Valentine, DVM, planned on a big city boutique vet practice with high profile clients, easy hours, and lucrative profits. All until the man who was more father to her than her own asks for her help, and she ends up back in the backwater where all she has are bad memories.
Brody figures cutting her ties to the past would be a hell of a lot easier if she could only avoid the woman she’s never been able to forget. Since Val never even knew she was alive back in high school, that shouldn’t be too hard now. When their lives collide, both women discover what might have been is closer than they think.

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley and Radclyffe for the ebook copy to review.

Like:

– The publisher: almost always creates great books and many that are centered around the medical world
– ER, medics, vet practice all in one book – authentic and well written as always
– Lots of details to get to know the town and make it feel like you’re really there in the story
– Romance, but need to wait until more than half way through for it

Love:
– Good representation LGBTQIA+
– Romance in the medical field – a personal favorite of mine
– Medical info is well done – always makes for a much better, more authentic read
– There’s a trans character as well

Dislike:
– Couldn’t get into the book in the beginning – I read other books from the same author and was captivated right away. To be fair, I was tired when reading Love to the Rescue so that may have been a factor.
– The tension, awkwardness and almost hatred at the beginning
– Family drama – might be realistic but not enjoyable to read about

Wish that:
– Captured my attention more
– More of a feel good book. It’s not bad, but lately I’m not quite in the mood for drama and tension in my personal life.

Overall, good but not my favorite novel that I’ve read by Radclyffe. As always, I love the romance, medical field setting, and LGBTQIA+ centric characters. I didn’t love the tension and family drama throughout. I would still recommend Love to the Rescue by Radclyffe.

 

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3.5 Star Books · ARC Book Reviews · Book Reviews · feminism · non fiction · psychology · science · Self Help · Uncategorized

Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle by Emily and Amelia Nagoski  | ARC #BookReview

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Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle by Emily and Amelia Nagoski 

Published: March 26, 2019

Publisher: Ballantine Books

Pages: 320

Genres: non fiction, self help, science, psychology, feminism

Rating: 3.5 stars 

Recommend to fans of: stressed out caregivers, women trying to figure out how to make their life better

Foodie Vibes: a healthy balanced meal with a dessert that you can eat at a leisurely pace without stress

 

Synopsis: 

This groundbreaking book explains why women experience burnout differently than men—and provides a simple, science-based plan to help women minimize stress, manage emotions, and live a more joyful life.

Burnout. Many women in America have experienced it. What’s expected of women and what it’s really like to be a woman in today’s world are two very different things—and women exhaust themselves trying to close the gap between them. How can you “love your body” when every magazine cover has ten diet tips for becoming “your best self”? How do you “lean in” at work when you’re already operating at 110 percent and aren’t recognized for it? How can you live happily and healthily in a sexist world that is constantly telling you you’re too fat, too needy, too noisy, and too selfish?

Sisters Emily Nagoski, PhD, and Amelia Nagoski, DMA, are here to help end the cycle of feeling overwhelmed and exhausted. Instead of asking us to ignore the very real obstacles and societal pressures that stand between women and well-being, they explain with compassion and optimism what we’re up against—and show us how to fight back. In these pages you’ll learn

• what you can do to complete the biological stress cycle—and return your body to a state of relaxation
• how to manage the “monitor” in your brain that regulates the emotion of frustration
• how the Bikini Industrial Complex makes it difficult for women to love their bodies—and how to defend yourself against it
• why rest, human connection, and befriending your inner critic are keys to recovering and preventing burnout

With the help of eye-opening science, prescriptive advice, and helpful worksheets and exercises, all women will find something transformative in these pages—and will be empowered to create positive change. Emily and Amelia aren’t here to preach the broad platitudes of expensive self-care or insist that we strive for the impossible goal of “having it all.” Instead, they tell us that we are enough, just as we are—and that wellness, true wellness, is within our reach.

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, Ballantine Books, and Emily and Amelia Nagoski for an ARC ebook copy to review. As always, an honest review from me.

Like: 

  • Very educational, especially the science behind burnout and stress
  • There’s a book talking about burnout – need more of these!!!
  • Examples of how family and friends can step up and help reduce the stress on the caregivers – even though I don’t anticipate my family doing those things to help me

Love:

  • The explanation about the emotional expectations for caregivers – so spot on !
  • Goes into how stress can affect the body physically 

Dislike: 

Wish that:

  • It was more what I was hoping for. I was hoping for more practical applications, not just telling me the science of it. 
  • More examples of people dealing with burnout that related to me — didn’t see myself represented much in the book despite myself being a caregiver experiencing stress and burnout

Overall, there’s lots of good, science based information about stress and burnout. However, I wish that I related to the book more as I thought it was really going to help me. 

 

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3.5 Star Books · ARC Book Reviews · Book Reviews · mystery · suspense · thriller

Never Tell by Lisa Gardner | Release Day #BookReview

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Never Tell by Lisa Gardner 

Published: February 19, 2019 

Publisher: Dutton Books 

Pages: 416 

Genres: mystery, thriller, suspense

Rating: 3.5 stars 

Recommend to fans of: her other books in the series, police procedurals, mysteries written by women 

Foodie Vibes: green smoothie with all your macros that your overbearing mother made for you 

 

Synopsis: 

A man is dead, shot three times in his home office. But his computer has been shot twelve times, and when the cops arrive, his pregnant wife is holding the gun.

D. D. Warren arrives on the scene and recognizes the woman—Evie Carter—from a case many years back. Evie’s father was killed in a shooting that was ruled an accident. But for D.D., two coincidental murders is too many.

Flora Dane sees the murder of Conrad Carter on the TV news and immediately knows his face. She remembers a night when she was still a victim—a hostage—and her captor knew this man. Overcome with guilt that she never tracked him down, Flora is now determined to learn the truth of Conrad’s murder.

But D.D. and Flora are about to discover that in this case the truth is a devilishly elusive thing. As layer by layer they peel away the half-truths and outright lies, they wonder: How many secrets can one family have?

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, Dutton Books, and Lisa Gardner for an ARC ebook copy to review. As always, an honest review from me.

Like:

  • The main characters in this series (Detective D.D. Warren and Flora) – strong, intelligent female roles
  • Longish book but a quick engaging read 
  • The reveal of the killer … just wait for it!
  • The pacing of the writing 

Love: 

  • The past and the present cases coming together makes for a very great mystery 
  • Finding out what the recent murder victim really was hiding #Interesting

Dislike:

  • The mother of the victim – so over the top and somewhat unbelievable 

Wish that: 

  • The last 1/4 of the book kept my attention better – for all the action I thought I would be more engaged 

Overall, another solid mystery from the author in her D.D. Warren series. Not my favorite book of hers. But I did enjoy the return of Flora in a new role.

 

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Who is your favorite mystery/thriller author? 

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3.5 Star Books · ARC Book Reviews · Book Reviews · Christian fiction · contemporary fiction · contemporary romance

One Thing I Know by Kara Isaac | ARC #BookReview

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One Thing I Know by Kara Isaac

Published: February 12, 2019

Publisher: Howard Books

Pages: 384

Genres: contemporary fiction, contemporary romance, Christian fiction 

Rating: 3.5 stars

Recommend to fans of: sweet but realistic romances, Christian fiction that isn’t religion heavy books about the bookish wolrd

Foodie Vibes: a nice dinner at a fancy restaurant – business networking 

 

Synopsis: 

A fresh, heartfelt romance involving a case of mistaken identity when a ghostwriter masquerades as a relationship expert and the man who is determined to expose her holds not only the key to her success, but also her heart…

Rachel Somers is America’s #1 relationship coach—America just doesn’t know it. Rachel writes the books, but her Aunt Donna plays the face of the operation. Afraid of their secret being exposed, Rachel has no choice but to keep up the charade or lose the big money required to care for her father.

Lucas Grant is a star of late night radio and set on achieving his dream of syndication. When a big-time producer calls, it looks like his hard work is about to pay off. But the offer comes with a catch—the producer is convinced Dr. Donna is not what she seems and he wants Lucas to discover her secret. To do that, he needs to win over her tight-lipped assistant who holds the key to his success and—he begins to suspect—his heart. Can love find a way through the lies that force them apart?

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, Howard Books and Kara Isaac for an ARC ebook copy to review. As always, an honest review from me. 

Like: 

  • The sweet and realistic romance 
  • Romance in a casual work setting 
  • The main characters: relatable with good intentions 
  • Dr. Donna: I wasn’t a fan at the beginning, but came around to understand and like her. 
  • Easy fun read
  • The romance parts aren’t too overly descriptive that it would be inappropriate/uncomfortable to listen out loud, as an audiobook 

Love: 

  • Set in the book and publishing world – always a fun bonus!
  • Reminds me of an episode of Law and Order SVU (but without the sexual assault part) 

Dislike: 

  • The spicy food scene in the restaurant: Didn’t achieve the goal of bringing them together and just seemed weird/unnecessary 
  • I didn’t mind, but others might, that it didn’t mention religion until 80% of the way through. Not an intense Christian fiction book

Wish that: 

  • Some of the reasons for the deception didn’t fall together quite as easily 
  • Felt less disjointed: the first 2/3 and the last 1/3 of the story seemed different in tone and writing 

Overall, a fun sweet romance that I enjoyed. Nothing too intense, but perfect if you’re looking for a realistic happily ever after. Bonus points for being set in the bookish world!

 

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3.5 Star Books · ARC Book Reviews · Book Reviews · mystery · thriller

Forget You Know Me by Jessica Strawser | New Release #BookReview

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Forget You Know Me by Jessica Strawser

Published: February 5, 2019

Publisher: St. Martin’s Press

Pages: 336

Genres: thriller, mystery 

Rating: 3.5 stars 

Recommend to fans of: characters with a chronic illness/chronic pain, secrets to try to protect others and yourself

Foodie Vibes: an anti inflammatory diet in attempts to minimize your chronic pain 

 

Synopsis: 

When a video call between friends captures a shocking incident no one was supposed to see, the secrets it exposes threaten to change their lives forever.

Molly and Liza have always been enviably close. Even after Molly married Daniel, the couple considered Liza an honorary family member. But after Liza moved away, things grew more strained than anyone wanted to admit—in the friendship and the marriage.

When Daniel goes away on business, Molly and Liza plan to reconnect with a nice long video chat after the kids are in bed. But then Molly leaves the room to check on a crying child.

What Liza sees next will change everything.

Only one thing is certain: Molly needs her. Liza drives all night to be at Molly’s side—but when she arrives, the reception is icy, leaving Liza baffled and hurt. She knows there’s no denying what she saw.

Or is there?

In disbelief that their friendship could really be over, Liza is unaware she’s about to have a near miss of her own.

And Molly, refusing to deal with what’s happened, won’t turn to Daniel, either.

But none of them can go on pretending. Not after this.

Jessica Strawser’s Forget You Know Me is a “twisty, emotionally complex, powder keg of a tale” (bestselling author Emily Carpenter) about the wounds of people who’ve grown apart. Best, friends, separated by miles. Spouses, hardened by neglect. A mother, isolated by pain.

One moment will change things for them all.

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, St. Martin’s Press, and Jessica Strawser for an ARC ebook copy to review. As always, an honest review from me. 

Like:

  • The mystery, the secrets
  • The evolution of Molly’s relationship with her husband 
  • The premise reminds me of an episode of Law and Order SVU

Love: 

  • Good representation of chronic illness/chronic pain including the lack of energy, daily pain, frustration due to inability to complete all activities, loved ones not really getting it
  • Molly trying to be the best mom for her son despite her challenges and limitations 

Dislike: 

  • The lying, deception, and almost tricking of the other people – done for a reason but sometimes it crosses the line from good intentions to protecting only yourself

Wish that: 

  • Some parts made more sense

 

Overall, a good book. I especially loved that the main character deals with chronic pain. Well, I don’t love that she’s in pain, but I like the representation. We need more books like this. However, the weird secret keeping took away from my enjoyment at times. 

 

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3.5 Star Books · Book Reviews · coming of age · contemporary fiction · Literary Fiction

Chemistry by Weike Wang

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Chemistry by Weike Wang 

Published: May 23, 2017

Publisher: Knopf Publishing Group

Pages: 224

Genres: literary fiction, contemporary fiction, coming of age

Rating: 3.5 stars

Recommend to fans of: young adults who don’t have it all figured it out, overbearing (to the Western culture) Chinese parents, parent – adult children relationships 

Foodie Vibes: leftover pizza #GradSchoolLife

 

Synopsis: 

Three years into her graduate studies at a demanding Boston university, the unnamed narrator of this nimbly wry, concise debut finds her one-time love for chemistry is more hypothesis than reality. She’s tormented by her failed research–and reminded of her delays by her peers, her advisor, and most of all by her Chinese parents, who have always expected nothing short of excellence from her throughout her life. But there’s another, nonscientific question looming: the marriage proposal from her devoted boyfriend, a fellow scientist, whose path through academia has been relatively free of obstacles, and with whom she can’t make a life before finding success on her own.

Eventually, the pressure mounts so high that she must leave everything she thought she knew about her future, and herself, behind. And for the first time, she’s confronted with a question she won’t find the answer to in a textbook: What do I really want?Over the next two years, this winningly flawed, disarmingly insightful heroine learns the formulas and equations for a different kind of chemistry–one in which the reactions can’t be quantified, measured, and analyzed; one that can be studied only in the mysterious language of the heart. Taking us deep inside her scattered, searching mind, here is a brilliant new literary voice that astutely juxtaposes the elegance of science, the anxieties of finding a place in the world, and the sacrifices made for love and family.

 

Review:

Chemistry is many different things. A grad student unsure about her academic future. A daughter feeling pressure from her Chinese parents. A girlfriend trying to figure out her relationship. And a friend asking for support. The book is essentially a coming of age story for someone in their mid 20s. I like that it’s funny, relatable and shows a woman in science. 

While the story is about a woman who doesn’t know where she’s going, the book doesn’t really go anywhere. The cultural explorations are great, but the rest is mediocre.

Overall, I can see why this book is popular and recommend it, but don’t expect it to be things its not. 

 

 

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3.5 Star Books · ARC Book Reviews · Book Reviews · non fiction · psychology · Self Help

Anger Management for Everyone: Ten Proven Strategies to Help You Control Anger and Live a Happier Life by Raymond Chip Tafrate, Howard Kassinove

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Anger Management for Everyone: Ten Proven Strategies to Help You Control Anger and Live a Happier Life by Raymond Chip Tafrate, Howard Kassinove

Published: January 2, 2019

Publisher: Impact

Pages: 256

Genres: self help, non fiction, psychology

Rating: 3.5 stars

Recommend to fans of: people who have lots of conflicts with others, wanting to change yourself for the New Year, angry people 

Foodie Vibes: chamomile tea to help calm yourself 

 

Synopsis: 

We all get angry sometimes. But if you feel angry all of time—and if your anger makes others uncomfortable, creates distance in your relationships, disrupts your ability to think clearly and make good decisions, or otherwise results in behaviors that you regret or find embarrassing later—it’s time to make a change.

Written by two clinical psychologists with decades of experience using cognitive behavioral interventions to treat anger, Anger Management for Everyone provides a comprehensive, research-based program to keep anger in its place. This revised and updated second edition includes new information on the environmental effects on anger, such as hunger and sleep; new progressive muscle relaxation and mindfulness exercises; and new strategies and tips for improving social and interpersonal skills.

With the authors’ enhanced “Anger Episode Model,” and the ten proven-effective skills for anger management in this helpful guide, you’ll come to better understand and control your problem anger, learn how to cope with everyday disappointments and frustrations, and experience more happiness, success, and vitality in all areas of your life.

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, Impact, Raymond Chip Tafrate, and Howard Kassinove for an ARC ebook copy to review. As always, an honest review from me.

The beginning of the book was startling. The language made it seem as if it was written for people who are out of control angry. As I kept reading I learned that the techniques discussed can be used for most people. But before I go into my review of the book, let’s define anger. According to the book anger is an emotional reaction to the unwanted and often unexpected behavior of others. It often develops as a sense of threat. A very helpful definition. 

The book helps the reader to learn about anger in general, their own anger reactions, reason behind anger, many different suggestions to deal with anger, many examples to further explain the tools, and also activities to practice new anger reducing techniques that you’ve learned. Since there’s a lot of information, some of it is bound to resonate with and help you. I’m not an incredibly angry person, but I could relate to some of the techniques presented. I liked the suggested of avoidance as a valid response to anger. It’s not the only response a person should use, but sometimes it’s best in that moment. 

I didn’t think that the examples were very relatable to me. While they were plentiful and well explained, I couldn’t see myself represented in most of the them. Also regarding someone who constantly provokes an anger response in me; these techniques didn’t work when used with them. Not sure if that’s the techniques or they’re just a toxic person. 

Overall, a helpful book filled with many explanations and techniques to help you appropriately deal with your anger. 

 

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3.5 Star Books · ARC Book Reviews · Archeology · biography · Book Reviews · history · science · sociology

New Release | The Curse of Oak Island: The Story of the World’s Longest Treasure Hunt by Randall Sullivan

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The Curse of Oak Island: The Story of the World’s Longest Treasure Hunt by Randall Sullivan 

Published: December 11, 2018

Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press

Pages: 396

Genres: non fiction, history, archeology, biography 

Rating: 3.5 stars

Recommend to fans of: history mysteries that are unsolved, conspiracy theories and legends

Foodie Vibes: fish and coconuts 

 

Synopsis: 

In 1795, a teenager discovered a mysterious circular depression in the ground on Oak Island, in Nova Scotia, Canada, and ignited rumors of buried treasure. Early excavators uncovered a clay-lined shaft containing layers of soil interspersed with wooden platforms, but when they reached a depth of ninety feet, water poured into the shaft and made further digging impossible.

Since then the mystery of Oak Island’s “Money Pit” has enthralled generations of treasure hunters, including a Boston insurance salesman whose obsession ruined him; young Franklin Delano Roosevelt; and film star Errol Flynn. Perplexing discoveries have ignited explorers’ imaginations: a flat stone inscribed in code; a flood tunnel draining from a man-made beach; a torn scrap of parchment; stone markers forming a huge cross. Swaths of the island were bulldozed looking for answers; excavation attempts have claimed two lives. Theories abound as to what’s hidden on Oak Island—pirates’ treasure, Marie Antoinette’s lost jewels, the Holy Grail, proof that Sir Francis Bacon was the true author of Shakespeare’s plays—yet to this day, the Money Pit remains an enigma.

The Curse of Oak Island is a fascinating account of the strange, rich history of the island and the intrepid treasure hunters who have driven themselves to financial ruin, psychotic breakdowns, and even death in pursuit of answers. And as Michigan brothers Marty and Rick Lagina become the latest to attempt to solve the mystery, as documented on the History Channel’s television show The Curse of Oak Island, Sullivan takes readers along to follow their quest firsthand.

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, Atlantic Monthly Press and Randall Sullivan for an ARC ebook copy to review. Sorry for the bit of a late review. I was out of power for 3 days due to a winter storm and am a little late on my book reviews. As always, an honest review from me. 

The intrigue is definitely there for a lot of people. The book made me see why so many people get caught up in searching for a treasure they’re not even sure exists. The book goes into great detail about the history of the island and people throughout the ages. You will definitely learn a lot. It’s very detail oriented. I was more interested in the brief overview of the more exciting aspects, so it was a bit much for me. I absolutely loved learning about the conspiracy theories and different cultures that could possibly tie into it. A unique way to learn about atypical parts of history such as the Acadians, Templar Knights and U.S. Presidential ties to the Money Pit. Also the creepy factor was fun to read, but would freak me out in real life. Also the book is a companion to the tv show. 

There weren’t too many downsides to the book. It is jam packed with names, dates, and events so there’s a lot to remember. I read maybe 30-50 pages per day, because any more was too much information at once. So, not a quick read. 

Overall, The Curse of Oak Island is filled with all sorts of information about the legend and history surrounding the Money Pit. Informative, incredibly intriguing, and creepy. I definitely recommend if you’re looking for an all encompassing read about the topic. 

 

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3.5 Star Books · ARC Book Reviews · Book Reviews · mystery · psychological drama · psychological thriller · thriller

New Release | The One That Got Away by Joe Clifford

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The One That Got Away by Joe Clifford

Published: December 3, 2018

Publisher: Down & Out Books

Pages: 278

Genres: mystery, thriller, psychological thriller

Rating: 3.5 stars

Recommend to fans of: all the characters are flawed, messed up small towns, small town mysteries with a big city feel

Foodie Vibes: beer at the local dive bar

 

Synopsis: 

In the early 2000s, a string of abductions rocked the small upstate town of Reine, New York. Only one girl survived: Alex Salerno. The killer, Ken Parsons, was sent away. Life returned to normal. No more girls would have to die. Until another one did.

It’s been twelve years since Kira Shanks was reported missing and presumed dead. Alex Salerno has been living in New York City, piecemealing paychecks to earn a livable wage, trying to forget those three days locked underground and her affair with Sean Riley, the married detective who rescued her. When Noah Lee, hometown reporter with a journalistic pedigree, requests an interview, Alex returns to Reine and Riley, reopening old wounds. What begins as a Q&A for a newspaper article soon turns into an opportunity for money, closure and—justice. The disappearance of Kira Shanks has long been hung on Benny Brudzienski, a hulking man-child who is currently a brain-addled guest at the Galloway State Mental Hospital. But after Alex reconnects with ex-classmates and frenemies, doubts are cast on that guilt. Alex is drawn into a dangerous game of show and tell in an insular town where everyone has a secret to hide. And as more details emerge about the night Kira Shanks went missing, Alex discovers there are some willing to kill to protect the horrific truth.

In the modern vein of Girl on the Train and The Bone Collector, The One That Got Away is a dark, psychological thriller, featuring a compelling, conflicted heroine and a page-turning narrative that races toward its final, shocking conclusion.

 

Review:

Thank you to NetGalley, Down & Out Books, and Joe Clifford for an ARC ebook copy to review. As always, an honest review from me. Sorry about the late review folks, my power was out for 3 days due to a winter snowstorm, so I’m a bit late on my book reviews. 

The One That Got Away is all about small towns. Their secrets, the people, the drama. There’s certainly no forgetting and no forgiving in this town, and yet people don’t really want to investigate the truth. 

I like that the author explores that a small destitute town can be filled with so much drama, complex interpersonal relationships, and heartache. Nothing and no one is perfect. And nothing is as it originally seems. People are complex and so are the life lessons in the book. It also explores how people seem to want the perfect little victim and Alex, the main character, isn’t that. 

What happens when the victim grows up, has difficulty in life or just doesn’t fit into that cookie cutter mold of a sweet innocent victim? What if she has a voice that isn’t calm, polished and poised? What if she speaks her mind no matter what?

Despite all of these great questions and conversations the book brings up, there are some downsides to it. I didn’t like that the “r” word was used multiple times. Yes, it fits the ignorance of the characters who use it, but it still bothers me. Also the police detective … oh let me count the ways he crossed the line.

Overall, there’s more than what initially meets the eye with The One That Got Away. Complex themes, complex flawed characters, lots of drama and mystery fill the pages, keeping you captivated throughout. 

 

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3.5 Star Books · Book Reviews · mystery · suspense · thriller

The Flight Attendant by Chris Bohajalian 

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The Flight Attendant by Chris Bohajalian

Published: March 13, 2018

Publisher: Doubleday Books

Pages: 356 

Genres: mystery, thriller, suspense 

Rating: 3.5 stars

Recommend to fans of: cross continental thrillers, people unsure about their reality, spy mysteries

Foodie Vibes: wine and peanuts served on the flight 

 

Synopsis:

Cassandra Bowden is no stranger to hungover mornings. She’s a binge drinker, her job with the airline making it easy to find adventure, and the occasional blackouts seem to be inevitable. She lives with them, and the accompanying self-loathing. When she awakes in a Dubai hotel room, she tries to piece the previous night back together, already counting the minutes until she has to catch her crew shuttle to the airport. She quietly slides out of bed, careful not to aggravate her already pounding head, and looks at the man she spent the night with. She sees his dark hair. His utter stillness. And blood, a slick, still wet pool on the crisp white sheets. Afraid to call the police—she’s a single woman alone in a hotel room far from home—Cassie begins to lie. She lies as she joins the other flight attendants and pilots in the van. She lies on the way to Paris as she works the first class cabin. She lies to the FBI agents in New York who meet her at the gate. Soon it’s too late to come clean—or face the truth about what really happened back in Dubai. Could she have killed him? If not, who did?

 

Review:

The Flight Attendant is a heart poundiogly good book that keeps you on the edge of your airline seat. Cassie is a flight attendant. Good at her job, but reckless in her personal life, which is very evident when she wakes up from being blackout drunk lying next to a murdered man. She doesn’t remember what happened, but she’s pretty sure she didn’t kill him. Things are about to get complicated.

She’s determined to find out what happened and prove to herself and others that she’s innocent. The book takes us on a wild ride across the world. 

While I didn’t like Cassie’s behavior at times, it absolutely set the book up in the best way. Also the ending was a bit of a let down. The mystery aspect, not the action. The action was fantastic. 

Overall, a good read that inspires me to read more by the author.

 

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